Information

Gallienus, Cinquantenaire Museum



Cinquantenaire

The Parc du Cinquantenaire (French for "Park of the Fiftieth Anniversary", pronounced [paʁk dy sɛ̃kɑ̃tnɛʁ] ) or Jubelpark (Dutch for "Jubilee Park", pronounced [ˈjybəlpɑrk] ) is a large public, urban park of 30 ha (74 acres) in the easternmost part of the European Quarter in Brussels, Belgium.

Most buildings of the U-shaped complex which dominate the park were commissioned by the Belgian government under the patronage of King Leopold II for the 1880 National Exhibition commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the Belgian Revolution. During successive exhibitions in the same area, more structures were added. The centrepiece memorial arch, known as the Cinquantenaire Arch (French: Arc du Cinquantenaire, Dutch: Triomfboog van het Jubelpark), was erected in 1905, replacing a previous temporary version of the arcade by Gédéon Bordiau. The structures were built in iron, glass and stone, symbolising Belgium's economic and industrial performance. The surrounding 30 ha (74 acres) park esplanade was full of picturesque gardens, ponds and waterfalls. It housed several trade fairs, exhibitions and festivals at the beginning of the century. In 1930, the government decided to reserve the Cinquantenaire for use as a leisure park. [1]

The Royal Military Museum has been the sole tenant of the northern half of the complex since 1880. The southern half is occupied by the Art & History Museum and Autoworld vintage car museum. The Temple of Human Passions by Victor Horta, a remainder from 1886, and the Great Mosque of Brussels from 1978, are located in the north-western corner of the park (see map below).

Line 1 of the Brussels Metro and the Belliard Tunnel from Rue de la Loi/Wetstraat pass underneath the park, the latter partly in an open section in front of the arch. The nearest metro stations are Schuman to the west of the park, and Merode immediately to the east.


The Origins of the Cinquantenaire Museum Edit

From the 15th to the 17th century, diplomatic gifts, mementoes and curiosa owned by the Dukes of Burgundy and subsequently the Habsburg archdukes were displayed in the Royal Arsenal, a large hall in the vicinity of the palace on the Coudenberg. It was there that the first collections, which are now housed in the Royal Museums of Art and History, were established. Regrettably, a large number of art treasures and objects were removed to the imperial museums in Vienna in 1794. In 1835, with the intention of giving the independence of the young Belgian State an historical perspective, a Musée d’Armes anciennes, d’Armures, d’Objets d’Art et de Numismatique ("Museum of Antique Weapons, Armour, Object of Art and Numismatics") was established, headed by Count Amédée de Beauffort. The collections were moved to the Palais de l’Industrie, the left wing of the present Royal Museums of Fine Art.

From the Halle Gate to the Cinquantenaire Palace Edit

Subsequently named the Musée royal d'Armures, d'Antiquités et d'Ethnologie ("Royal Museum of Armour, Antiquities and Ethnology"), the institution transferred its collections to the recently restored Halle Gate, a surviving gate of the old city wall ringing Brussels. The first head curator was Antoine-Guillaume-Bernard Scheyes and the collections expanded rapidly, thanks to important bequests from such persons as Gustave Hegemans (1861) and Emile de Meester de Ravestein (1874). When the Halle Gate became too small to hold the continually expanding number of items, the decision was taken to split the collections, and in 1889, under the new head curator, Eugène Van Overloop, the objects from classical antiquity were moved to the Cinquantenaire Palace, which had been built on the initiative of King Leopold II. In 1906, the ethnographic collection was likewise transferred there, the collection of arms and armour remaining at the Halle Gate. The new museum complex at the Cinquantenaire was named the Royal Museums of Decorative and Industrial Art. That name was changed in 1912 to the Royal Museums of the Cinquantenaire, but, to prevent confusion, had to be changed yet again when the Museum of the Armed Forces and Military History was also established at the Cinquantenaire in 1922. The institution became the Royal Museums of Art and History, a name that was officially confirmed in 1926, and which has remained unchanged to the present day. In 1925, Eugène Van Overloop was succeeded by the Egyptologist Jean Capart, during whose term of office the museums became a leading scientific institution. Indeed, the interwar period proved to be an auspicious period for them: the collections of the Cinquantenaire Museum were expanded, funds increased and various research centres were set up in addition, various scientific expeditions were organised, one of them to Easter Island in 1936.

The Cinquantenaire Museum after the Second World War Edit

The Second World War brought a sharp halt to the activities of the RMAH. The collections were taken to safety and, in 1942, Henry Lavachery took over from Jean Capart. Immediately after the war, he began a thorough reorganisation of the institution. In 1946, a fierce fire reduced an entire wing of the Cinquantenaire Museum to ashes, as well as destroying part of the collections housed there. Rebuilding took time and it was only in 1966 that the new wing was inaugurated. The work was expertly led by Count Charles de Borchgrave d’Altena, head curator from 1951 to 1963, and by his immediate successor Pierre Gilbert. All the while, they were expanding the collections (with, among other things, the series of tapestries The History of Jacob) and modernising the museum. Their successors as head curator have continued the work of reorganisation and renovation and since the mid-1980s have seen some eighty big, temporary exhibitions organised, adding to the institution’s dynamism.


Practical information

Depending on your place of departure, you will either arrive at Schuman Station or Bruxelles Station.

Schuman : The Museum is accessible on foot from Schuman Station.

Bruxelles Central : From Bruxelles Central Station, take Metro line 1 towards Stockel or line 2 towards Herrmann-Debroux

The Museum is accessible on foot via the following Metro stops :

By metro (accessible on foot via the Schuman and Merode Metro stations)

The Museum is accessible on foot via the following Metro stops :

By bus (Many buses stop close to the museum)

By bus (accessible on foot via many bus stops)

Many buses stop close to the museum.

Number 61 towards the Gare du Nord or Montgomery
Number 80 towards Porte de Namur or Maes
Number 27 towards Andromède or the Gare du Midi. The Number 27 stops at other points near the Museum : Nerviens or Gaulois.

Number 36 towards Schuman or Konkel
Number 79 towards Kraainem or Schuman
Number 60 towards Ambiorix or Uccle Calevoet
Number 12 towards Brussels City
Number 21 towards Brussels Airport or Luxembourg

Plan your bus journey on the STIB website.

By car (we strongly advise to use public tranport to reach the museum)

From January 2020 onwards, due to the renovation project of the rooftops in the Cinquantenaire Park, the esplanade will be restricted only to vehicles of suppliers, staff, emergency services, park wardens and contractors performing the work.

More information can be found here.

Since January 1st, 2018 the Brussels-Capital Region has become a Low Emission Zone (LEZ). If you are entering the city in a car or van, check here to find out whether you are allowed to drive your vehicle within the LEZ. If you do not meet the conditions, we would remind you that there are park-and-ride car parks on the access routes leading into Brussels as well as alternatives to the car.

Opening hours

Tuesday - Friday9:30 - 17:00
Saturday, Sunday and national holidays10:00 - 17:00
The museum is closed on the 1st January, 1st of May, 1st and 11th of November and the 25th of December.

School & Groups visits

To reserve guided tours for groups, please contact our booking office:
Tel : +32 (0)2 741 73 02
(Tue - Fri 9:00-12:00 + 13:00-16:00)
E-mail : [email protected]
reservation at least three weeks in advance

Tickets

Permanent collection

Adult (19-64 year)10€
65+, Adult groups (min. 15 people)8€
Concessions More information4€
Pavilion of Human Passions (closed)2,50€
0-18 years, museumPASSmusées holders or special ticket prices More information0€

Temporary exhibition

Adult (19-64 year)15€
65+, Adult groups (min. 15 people), and special ticket prices More information12€
6-18 years, museumPASSmusées, and special ticket prices More information5€
0-6 years0€

Combined ticket

Combiticket for permanent and temporary exhibitions20€
Combiticket - permanent collections - 3 museums on Cinquantenaire Park More information22€

Plaster cast workshop

Next to the Museum buildings is an hidden gem : our plaster-cast workshop. Over the last 150 years, more than 4000 casts of works of art from all over the world have been molded and now form a collection in their own right. Despite the age of the workshop, it is still active. Every day reproductions, big and small, are produced using an ancient and artisanal technique. It is possible to order reproductions directly from the workshop, and to visit this lovely, quite hidden site.

Museumshop

Looking for a special gift, a wonderful book or a fun toy that’s linked to art or history? Then you absolutely must take a look around the Museum boutique or the exposhops which pop up during our temporary exhibitions. Access to the different boutiques is free!

Art & History Museum
Cinquantenaire Park 10 — 1000 Brussels
[email protected]
+32 (0)2 741 73 62

Library

The Scientific Library of the Art and History Museum is one of the largest museum libraries in Belgium. It specializes in art and archeology and the content of its publications is closely linked to the fields of our museum collections. First and foremost, the library offers scientific support to the running of the Museum with regard to its collections and scientific work. However, it is also accessible to all for the purposes of study and research.

Photographic Library

The Museum’s photographic library handles all pictorial material relating to the items in the Museum’s collections. It is possible to order digital images online by filling in an order form.

Support us!

Choose one of the existing propositions and participate in the realization of our projects or contact us for a turnkey solution.

Complaints

The Art & History Museum attaches a lot of importance to the quality of the services they offer. However you do have a comment relating to the museum you can let us know it. We shall do everything possible to avoid similar complaints in the future.


Visiting

Welcome to the Art & History Museum!

Due to the Covid measures your visit will differ from a normal museum visit. We have some information and guidelines, meant to ensure a safe and pleasant visit to our museum. We ask you kindly but firmly to follow these guidelines for your own safety and the safety of our personnel.

Planning your visit:

  • Tickets can be bought online, per timeslot. Print your tickets beforehand or keep them ready on a mobile device. Present your card at the reception desk on the day of your visit if you ordered a special ticket (with reduction or free) (for example: museumPassmusée).
  • The museum is open from Tuesday until Friday, from 9.30 am until 5 pm, and on Saturday and Sunday, from 10am until 5pm. Last entry to the museum is at 4pm!
  • Lockers are available for use.

During your visit:

  • Follow the guidelines regarding social distancing, both towards other visitors and to our staff.
  • A mouth mask is mandatory over the age of 10.
  • The museumshop is open.
  • Our restaurant is currently closed.

We hope you will enjoy your journey through time and across the world!

Art & History Museum
Parc du Cinquantenaire 10, 1000 Brussels
[email protected]
+ 32 (0)2 741 73 31

Train
The nearest stations are Merode and Schuman (within walking distance of the Museum) or Central Station (metro connection to the Art & History Museum).

Metro
The nearest station is &lsquoSchuman&rsquo.

Bus
22, 27, 80: stop at &lsquoGalliërs&rsquo 61: stop at &lsquoMerode&rsquo

Tram
81, 82: stop at &lsquoMerode&rsquo

With the car
From January 2020 onwards, due to the renovation project of the rooftops in the Cinquantenaire Park, the esplanade will be restricted only to vehicles of suppliers, staff, emergency services, park wardens and contractors performing the work..

Parking is possible in the streets around the park or in the public car parks. Within walking distance there are several car parks such as My Park (Galerie du Cinquantenaire, Rue des Ménapiens 18, 1040 Etterbeek), BePark parking Place Saint-Pierre (Rue de la Grande Haie 20, 1040 Etterbeek), Parking Rue de Tongres 2 (Rue des Tongres 60, 1200 Woluwe-Saint-Lambert). More info on BePark.

Since January 1st, 2018 the Brussels-Capital Region has become a Low Emission Zone (LEZ). If you are entering the city in a car or van, check here to find out whether you are allowed to drive your vehicle within the LEZ. If you do not meet the conditions, we would remind you that there are park-and-ride car parks on the access routes leading into Brussels as well as alternatives to the car.
Thank you for taking part in the regional effort aimed at improved air quality!

Buses carrying visitors
Buses carrying visitors can park in the designated area beyond the arcade (only possible if booked in advance). The driver of the bus logs on via the intercom at the entrance gate (Number 5). The visitors can then be dropped off in front of the museum and the driver can go to the bus zone.

Galleries
Tuesdays to Fridays: 9.30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturdays and Sundays: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Last tickets at 4 p.m. !

Closed on the 1th of January, 1th of May, 1th & 11th of November, 25th of December

COLLECTIONS ART & HISTORY MUSEUM
&euro 10: adults (19-64 years)

&euro 8: 65 +, adult group (min. 15 persons)

&euro 4: Students with valid student card Job seekers and integration income beneficiaries Belgian school teachers guides of the City of Brussels members of Friends of the mim, Diffusion Culturelle.

Free: 0-18 years (individually or in groups) one accompanying person of a school group, youth group or disadvantaged group People with disabilities and escort Members of ICOM-Vlaanderen, ICOM / Wallonie-Bruxelles card holders, Science Policy (Belspo) staff card holders journalists on presentation of a valid press pass Brussels Card museumPASSmusée Ribbedebie Attractions et Tourisme Sotheby's preferred Pass Art nouveau

&euro 30: Annual Pass for the permanent collections RMAH (18+)

Closed: Horta-Lambeaux Pavilion

&euro 22: Visit the 3 museums in the Park of the Cinquantenaire (Art & History Museum, Autoworld, Royal Museum of the Armed Forces and Military History) within 3 months at reduced prices! Only valid for permanent exhibitions.

museumPASSmusées: For &euro59 a year you can now visit all participating Belgian museums. Whenever you want and as often as you like. (https://www.museumpassmusees.be/fr)

TEMPORARY EXHIBITIONS
see the pages temporary exhibitions


Contents

The museum's first collections were assembled during the reigns of the Dukes of Burgundy and subsequently the Habsburg archdukes, and were placed in various locations in Brussels, their capital. In 1847, the newly formed Kingdom of Belgium acquired the artworks which were placed in the Halle Gate under the name of Musée royal d'Armures, d'Antiquités et d'Ethnologie ("Royal Museum of Armour, Antiquities and Ethnology"). By 1889, the gate had become too small and the collections were relocated to the Cinquantenaire Park (except for the armour and weapons which still remain in the gate). The Cinquantenaire used to be a military training facility until the 1880 National Exhibition when the large iron, glass and steel Cinquantenaire Palace was built with a military museum in the north wing. [2]

During the interwar period, the collections grew considerably due to Belgian scientific expeditions around the world most notably in Apamea (Syria), in Egypt by the Egyptologist Jean Capart, and in Easter Island in 1936, or by excavations in archaeological sites across Belgium. Many wealthy Belgians also donated artworks to the museum. In the mid-20th century, a new wing was built in the west of the building to house the classical antiquity collections. [2]

The museum was called the Cinquantenaire Museum but changed its name to the Art & History Museum in 2018. [1]

The Art & History Museum's collections are divided into four parts:

  • National archaeology
  • Classical antiquity
  • Non-European civilisations
  • European decorative arts

National archaeology Edit

The museum has a large collection of national archaeological pieces dating from prehistory, the Gallo-Roman period, to the Merovingian period (c. 751 AD ).

Prehistory Edit

The Prehistory room presents the vestiges of cultures and civilisations attested in what is now Belgium from the Paleolithic to the Iron Age. Tools, vases and jewellery are put back into context thanks to models and reconstructions which allow visitors to get an idea of the evolution of daily life during those different periods.

Gallo-Roman Belgium Edit

The conquest of Gaul by Caesar (c. 58–50 BC ) marked the beginning of a new era for Belgium. The development of craftsmanship is confirmed by the richness and diversity of artefacts dating from that period: ceramic dishes, fibulae, bronze figurines, as well as glass, bronze and silver containers, the most refined examples of which come from rich funerary furniture. The reconstructions of a Roman villa facade, a heating system, and even a painted wall decor, embody the Gallo-Roman culture.

Merovingian civilisation Edit

The Merovingian civilisation is known to us mainly through the worship of the dead. In this context, eight tombs are reconstructed in the room presenting this period. Furniture from other graves is distributed in themed display cases where visitors can admire jewellery, belt buckles and other fibulae.

Classical antiquity Edit

The museum's collection houses early art from the ancient Middle-Eastern, Egyptian, Greek and Roman civilisations.

Middle East Edit

The Middle East, one of the cradles of civilisation, is presented through reliefs, jewellery and many earthen objects dating from prehistoric times to the dawn of the Islamic period (c. 610 AD ). The cylinder-seals, personal seals and Luristan bronzes make up some of the highlights of the collection.


Keizerskip [ bewurkje seksje | boarne bewurkje ]

Yn 253 waard Galliënus keizer, neidat Aemilianus yn in fjildslach troch syn eigen soldaten fermoarde waard en de senaat syn heit as opfolger beneamd hienen.

Hy krige de twifeleftich eare dat ûnder syn bewâld de measte usurpators wienen fan hiel de keizertiid. Ien fan dizze usurpators Postumus, stifte sels in eigen ryk, mei senaat en al: it Gallo-Romeinske ryk. Dat ryk soe sels yn stân bliuwe fan 260 ôf (nei de moard op Saloninus) oant 274, doe't Tetrikus I en II harren oerjoegen oan keizer Aurelianus.

Bûten al dizze troanpretendinten hie Galliënus te stellen mei diverske barbaarske folken oan de grins fan it ryk dy't nochal aktyf wiene mei ynfallen. En it koe der ek noch wol by dat syn heit yn it easten fan it ryk finzen nommen waard troch de Perzen en yn 260 deade.

Om it folk fan Rome net folle fan dizze problemen merkbite te litten, fierde Galliënus in wiidweidige propagandakampanje. Hy wie dêr tige súksesfol yn. Troch himsels op in grut tal munten ôf te byldzjen as fromme, dippere, oerwinnende en genedige keizer, en ek as beskermling fan in hiele rige goaden wist hy it folk oan syn side te hâlden.

Troch alle herfoarmingen hie Galliënus nochal wat tsjinstanners en yn septimber 268 waard hy dan ek ombrocht, as gefolch fan in gearspannen dêr't mooglik sawol Klaudius Gotikus as Aurelianus (syn opfolgers) by belutsen wienen. Nei syn dea hat Klaudius II him godlik ferklearre.


Arch of Gallienus

Like a lot of antiquities scattered around Rome, the Arch of Gallienus is tucked neatly away from city crowds. Built in 262 CE, it’s down a narrow side street and nestled up against a church, so you might not even notice it. But cross through this exact spot and you are following in the footsteps of emperors and murderers, poets and pillagers.

Known as a “triumphal arch,” it was built in honor of a not-so-great emperor named, you guessed it, Gallienus. His years in power weren’t actually all that triumphant, presiding over what’s known as the “Crisis of the Third Century.” But he did win some important battles and was a pretty good military leader, spearheading (no pun intended) improvements and reforms to how the Roman army operated. He was murdered after about 15 years of rule, 15 crazy years of invasions, provincial secessions, bloody battles, conspiracies, and assassinations.

The arch may be in honor of Gallienus, but it also marks the exact spot where, in the 4th century BCE, the Porta Esquilina (or Esquiline Gate) was constructed as part of the Servian Wall that protected the ancient City of Rome from invasion. It was called the Esquiline Gate because its passage was at the Esquiline Hill, one of the seven hills that made up earliest Rome. It was an important gate, both coming in and going out. Roman poets like Livy and Ovid both cite the gate, and victorious armies passed through it. But a gate swings both ways, and it also led to a gallows on the hill, and invading armies were always trying to breach it.

There is only a partial inscription left intact on the arch today, having lost a top row of stone blocks over the course of 17 centuries (it happens). Despite Gallienus’s checkered past, what’s there is pretty triumphal. Translated from Latin, it reads: To Gallienus, the most clement Emperor, whose unconquered virtue is only outdone by his piety, and to Salonina, most holy Augusta Empress. [Dedicated by] Eques Aurelius Victor, in complete devotion to their divine presence and majesties.

Now that’s how you dedicate an arch.

Know Before You Go

In the Metropolitan City of Rome, just west of the Vittorio Emanuele subway station


History

The Origins of the Cinquantenaire Museum

From the fifteenth to the seventeenth century, diplomatic gifts, mementoes and curiosa owned by the Burgundian dukes and subsequently the Habsburg archdukes were displayed in the Royal Arsenal, a large hall in the vicinity of the palace on the Coudenberg. It was there that the first collections were established that are now housed in the Royal Museums of Art and History. Regrettably, a large number of art treasures and objects were removed to the imperial museums in Vienna in 1794.

In 1835, with the intention of giving the independence of the young Belgian State an historical perspective, a Musée d&rsquoArmes anciennes, d&rsquoArmures, d&rsquoObjets d&rsquoArt et de Numismatique was established, headed by Count Amédée de Beauffort. The collections were moved to the Palais de l&rsquoIndustrie, the left wing of the present Royal Museums of Fine Art.

From the Halle Gate to the Cinquantenaire palace

Subsequently named the Musée royale d&rsquoArmures, d&rsquoAntiquités et d&rsquoEthnologie, the institution transferred its collections to the recently restored Halle Gate, a surviving gate of the old city wall ringing Brussels. The first head curator was Antoine-Guillaume-Bernard Scheyes and the collections expanded rapidly, thanks to important bequests from such persons as Gustave Hegemans (1861) and Emile de Meester de Ravestein (1874).

When the Halle Gate became too small to hold the continually increasing number of items, the decision was taken to split the collections and in 1889, under the new head curator, Eugène Van Overloop, the objects from Classical Antiquity were moved to the Cinquantenaire palace, which had been built on the initiative of King Leopold II. In 1906, the ethnographic collection was likewise transferred there, the collection of arms and armour remaining at the Hallepoort. The new museum complex at the Cinquantenaire was named the Royal Museums of Decorative and Industrial Art.

That name was changed in 1912 to the Royal Museums of the Cinquantenaire, but, to prevent confusion, had to be changed yet again when the Musée de l&rsquoArmée was established in 1922 at the Cinquantenaire, too. The institution now became the Royal Museums of Art and History, a name that was officially confirmed in 1926 and that has remained unchanged to the present day.

In 1925, Eugène Van Overloop was succeeded by the Egyptologist Jean Capart, during whose term of office the museums became a leading scientific institution. Indeed, the inter-war years proved to be an auspicious period for them: the collections of the Cinquantenaire Museum were expanded, funds increased and various research centres were set up in addition, various scientific expeditions were organized, one of them to Easter Island in 1936.

The Cinquantenaire Museum after the Second World War

The Second World War brought a sharp halt to the activities of the RMAH. The collections were taken to safety and, in 1942, Henry Lavachery took over from Jean Capart. Immediately after the war, he began a thorough reorganization of the institution. In 1946, a fierce fire reduced an entire wing of the Cinquantenaire Museum to ashes, as well as destroying part of the collections housed there. Rebuilding took time and it was only in 1966 that the new wing was inaugurated.

The work was expertly led by Count Charles de Borchgrave d&rsquoAltena, head curator from 1951 to 1963, and by his immediate successor Pierre Gilbert. All the while, they were expanding the collections (with, among other things, the series of tapestries (The History of Jacob&rsquo) and modernizing in museological terms.

Their successors as head curator have continued the work of reorganization and renovation and since the mid-1980s have seen some eighty, big, temporary exhibitions being organized, adding to the institution&rsquos dynamism.


All our objects are alive and have a story to tell. From Prehistoric to Art Nouveau, prepare to be amazed by unique and magnificent manmade masterpieces.

The Museum houses an incredible collection of works belonging to all four corners of the world (with the exception of Sub-Saharan Africa), dating from the prehistoric period to the 20th Century. This page is here to provide an insight into what these rich collections have to offer you.

In our National Archeology collections, you will discover the exciting history of our regions from the Stone Age to the Metal Ages through an exploration of the unique collection of Gallo – Roman discoveries all the way to the magnificent examples of Merovingian glasswork and metalwork.
Discover more

03 Merovingian craftsmanship

In our Antiquity wing, you will encounter the ancient Near-East, Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome. Feel free to admire the stunning Colonnade of Apamea and colorful Syrian mosaics, look ancient Roman emperors in the eye, and explore our Egyptian tombs along with our Mummy Hall.
Discover more

Here, Europe’s most beautiful creations have been assembled in one place: our European Decorative Arts section! You will be taken on a voyage through more than a thousand years of European art and culture. Starting at the Middle Ages, with shrines gilded with precious stones, silver and gold, you will pass through our internationally renowned collections of tapestries and retables and conclude at the collections of precision tools and precious items from the 17 th and 18 th Centuries. In addition, when in Brussels, our magnificent Art Nouveau and Art Deco collection, produced by Victor Horta and presented in an original shop interior, is of course not to be missed.
Discover more

How about a round-the world trip at the heart of Brussels? The beauty - both that which has been lost and that which exist to this day - of North and South America, South-East Asia, China, India, Nepal, Oceania, and the Islamic world, is displayed in our Non-European Civilizations Wing.
Discover more

Indeed, some of the art treasures in this museum are right out of the top drawer. Come to discover them and enjoy a visit in the Art & History Museum!

Research

There's so much more of our past left to discover! Outside of its roles in conservation and presentation, the Museum also takes care of scientific research projects and archeological missions, both in Belgium and abroad.

Plaster-cast Workshop

Next to the Museum buildings is an hidden gem : our plaster-cast workshop. Over the last 150 years, more than 4000 casts of works of art from all over the world have been molded and now form a collection in their own right. Despite the age of the workshop, it is still active. Every day reproductions, big and small, are produced using an ancient and artisanal technique. It is possible to order reproductions directly from the workshop, and to visit this lovely, quite hidden site.

Museumshop

Looking for a special gift, a wonderful book or a fun toy that’s linked to art or history? Then you absolutely must take a look around the Museum boutique or the exposhops which pop up during our temporary exhibitions. Access to the different boutiques is free!

Art & History Museum
Cinquantenaire Park 10 — 1000 Brussels
[email protected]
+32 (0)2 741 73 6

Library

The Scientific Library of the Art & History Museum is one of the largest museum libraries in Belgium. It specializes in art and archeology and the content of its publications is closely linked to the fields of our museum collections. First and foremost, the library offers scientific support to the running of the Museum with regard to its collections and scientific work. However, it is also accessible to all for the purposes of study and research.

Photographic Library

The Museum’s photographic library handles all pictorial material relating to the items in the Museum’s collections. It is possible to order digital images online by filling in an order form.

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Watch the video: Aurelian: Emperor Who Restored the World (January 2022).